Spring 2021 Transfer Seminars

Spring 2021 Transfer Seminars

TRANSFER SEMINARS are special sections of the 300-level Justice Core courses that all transfer students are required to take. They are taught by experienced faculty who are experts in their fields and will be able to connect you to academic and professional resources. Each seminar is assigned a peer success coach, who provides ongoing support and serves as a connection to the campus. The Spring 2021 Transfer Seminars will be held online in mixed synchronous and synchronous formats. 

TRANSFER ADVANTAGE SUCCESS SERIES:
FAST TRACK FOR POST GRADUATE SUCCESS
As a student in a transfer seminar, you will be able to apply for the special Transfer Advantage workshop series. Meetings take place during community hour, and students are guided on creating an integrated academic and career plan. 
transfer advantages

NOTE: Students are expected to be online and engage in live online class discussions during the specific days and times listed on the schedule below. Attendance is required for all virtual class sessions, and students are expected to respond in real time to instructor questions and assigned work. Additional class material will be delivered in an asynchronous format, according to the course syllabus.

AFRICANA STUDIES
HISTORY
HUMANITIES AND JUSTICE
ENGLISH LITERATURE
LATINX STUDIES
PHILOSOPHY
 

AFRICANA STUDIES

SELF, IDENTITY AND JUSTICE: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES  
AFR 319-02, T/TH 4:30 PM−5:45 PM (full)
Registration Code 60922
Professor Sami Disu

This course is an examination of some of the ways in which the development of the self is impacted by the quality of justice that is available to the individual. Students will develop an appreciation of the interaction between self, identity and justice. Using perspectives that have emerged from the enlightenment, modernity and globalization, we examine how these ways of thinking assist and often limit the ability to develop a healthy self. We will focus on how the policies of justice-related institutions affect self–work and therefore one’s access to justice. Case studies will illustrate these issues from the perspectives of gender, class, religion, ethnicity and race, in the United States and in other regions of the world.

RESISTANCE, REBELLION, RELIGION, AND PROTEST IN THE BLACK QUEST FOR JUSTICE
AFR 320-01, M/W 12:15 PM−1:30 PM 
(full)
Registration Code 61039
AFR 320-05, M/W 3:05 PM−4:20 PM 
(full)
Registration Code 10510
Professor Ilyasah Shabazz

The course will explore some of the most important topics identified and deemed as historical achievements in our nation. As a means of providing clarity to this struggle and quest for justice-films, music, speeches, and other literatures of significant influence will be explored. To maximize their understanding and intrinsic appreciation for justice, students will engage in projects/tasks to achieve various goals. They will develop an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural contexts of the struggles for justice throughout the world; analyze how struggles for justice have shaped societies and cultures throughout the world; and cultivate perspectives on historical and contemporary events and issues that have precipitated the "Black" struggle for justice throughout the world.

HISTORY

PRISONS, PEOPLE, AND PUNISHMENT IN THE UNITED STATES
HIS 320-03, TH 12:15 PM−1:30 PM (full)
Registration Code 9693
Professor Anissa Helie-Lucas 
HIS 320-04, TH 4:30 PM−5:45 PM (full)
Registration Code 8710 
Professor Anissa Helie-Lucas
This course examines the ways in which Americans have defined crime, explained its causes, and punished and rehabilitated criminals. It also explores the relationships among crime, social values, and social structure and questions of (in)justice from the late 18th century to the present. Areas of emphasis include the evolution of prison: theories, policies and reforms; the politics of incarceration: who is jailed, how, and why; the prison economy and privatization; and re-entry options: The Prison-to-College-Pipeline at John Jay College.

HISTORY AND JUSTICE IN THE WIDER WORLD
HIS 352-01, M 9:25 AM−10:40 AM (full)
Registration Code 8711
Professor Jonathan Epstein

This course explores the history and meaning of justice outside the United States and the modern history of humanitarian intervention--the involvement by individuals, organizations and foreign governments in the internal affairs of other societies, usually because of perceived abuses, “crimes” or human rights violations. Students will explore the development of the concepts of “humanity,” “human rights,” and the “legitimate” use of power to enforce these concepts. Focus will be centered on non-U.S. historical occurrences of humanitarian intervention in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the concepts of justice that have existed in the wider world. Through lecture, discussion, readings and video, we will examine these developments and how historians and others understand the past. We will also pursue the development of the following reasoning and content skills: ability to recognize and apply different historical approaches, formulate historical questions, explain the significance of different forms of historical evidence, construct a historical argument grounded in evidence from primary and/or secondary sources, and, trace historical trajectories and determine the interrelationship among themes, regions and periodization.

Top

HUMANITIES AND JUSTICE

COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON JUSTICE 
HJS 310-01, TH 4:30 PM−5:45 PM (full)
Registration Code 8522
Professor Hyunhee Park

Justice has been an important issue to people since ancient times, yet its concepts and practices have differed in various cultures. This course studies justice in the non-Western world as it is variously represented in historical, literary and philosophical texts. The course builds analytical skills and extends its coverage across geographical boundaries to the Mideast, Asia, Africa and the Americas. By studying how social, political, and religious institutions shape understandings of justice and injustice, and how these concepts define race, gender, ethnicity and class, the course focuses on articulations and practices of justice that are different from the Western constructs. Through comparative investigations of encounters between societies resulting from conquest, trade and social exchange, the course explores justice as culturally inflected, the product at once of a particular regional or national identity and history, and of intercultural contact.

Top

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

CRIME, PUNISHMENT, AND JUSTICE IN U.S. LITERATURE
LIT 326-07, T/TH 10:50 AM−12:05 PM (full)
Registration Code 9966
LIT 326-08, T/TH 12:15 PM−1:30 PM 
(full)
Registration Code 63261
Professor Marianne Giordani

Literary texts often deal with fictional characters and actions, but they can yield valuable insights about the actual causes of crime, the nature of the criminal, the investigative process, the force of law, the power of guilt, the responsibilities of judges and communities, and the realities and potential effects of punishment. In the process of offering a narrative account — or story — some texts delve deeply into the very issues and problems facing the society and culture of the author; if these issues and problems persist, the text may also shed light on the world of the future reader. This course examines literary texts about crime, punishment, and justice from the United States in order to explore how questions of right, wrong, and fairness have been and are understood. Students will read literary texts that question the psychological and social causes of crime, philosophies of law, the varieties and purposes of punishment, and what justice might mean in any given context. Critical and writing skills will be enhanced through close analysis of texts and the application of basic literary concepts and methods of interpretation. 

CRIME, PUNISHMENT, AND JUSTICE IN WORLD LITERATURES
LIT 327-03, M/W 4:30 PM−5:45 PM (full)
Registration Code 9309
Professor Mark Alpert

Racism, gender bias, and unjust laws have existed across the globe and throughout history! Our class examines these topics in World Literature to see what lessons we can apply to our own criminal justice system and to debate what can be done. We’ll explore the theme of crime and punishment in literature from different perspectives of justice (retributive, commutative, distributive, contributive), kinds of crime (legal, moral, social, and psychological), and kinds of law (natural, divine, human). As the title “crime and punishment” suggests, we will focus on the contexts and motivations for crime and society’s responses to crime. In this connection, we will also read some non-literary texts, such as law codes, philosophical texts, and other writings bearing on our subject. Some of the questions we will be considering are: the fit between crime and punishment; the criminal mind, and society’s responses to crime; social attitudes towards crime and criminals; the penal code; crime as a puzzle and detective work; and rationales of justice and punishment.

Top

LATINX STUDIES

LATINA/O STRUGGLES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE 
LLS 322-01, M/W 4:30 PM−5:45 PM (full)
Registration Code 8608
LLS 322-03, M/W 3:05 PM−4:30 PM 
(full)
Registration Code 55935
Professor Brian Montes

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the experiences of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and other Latino/as during the Civil Rights period. It focuses on the Latino/a social movements during the 1960s and their consequences today for the struggles for civil rights and social justice of Latino/as and other racial minorities in the U.S. Topics include access to education and employment; immigrant rights; detention and deportation; race and crime; Latino/a and African American alliance building; Latino/a citizenship and the military, and gender values and sexuality.

THE LATINA/O EXPERIENCE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
LLS 325-01, T/TH 12:15 PM−1:30 PM (full)
Registration Code 8613
Professor Nitza Esacalera 
This course analyzes the criminal justice system and its impact on the lives and communities of Latino/as and other groups in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on Latino/as human and civil rights and the role that race, ethnicity, gender and class play in the criminal justice system. Interdisciplinary readings and class discussions center on issues such as the overrepresentation of Latino/as and racial minorities in the criminal justice system; law and police-community relations; racial profiling; stop and frisk policies; immigration status; detentions and deportations; Latino/a youth; media representations; gangs; and access to education and employment and the school-to-prison pipeline.
 

Top

PHILOSOPHY

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES OF RIGHTS
PHI 302-05, M/W 12:15 PM−1:30 PM (full)
Registration Code 9987
Professor Matias Bulnes-Beniscelli
This course will explore a number of philosophical issues regarding the nature, justification, content and scope of rights. Fundamental issues include what is meant by the notion of a right, how rights are justified, and what rights we should have. Other issues will also be explored, including whether rights are universal or culturally determined, whether there needs to be a special category of women’s human rights, whether the scope of rights encompasses animals and ecosystems in addition to humans, and whether rights exist for groups as well as individuals.

PHILOSOPHY OF LAW IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
PHI 317-03, M/W 3:05 PM−4:30 PM (full)
Registration Code 9988
Professor Justine Borer

This course introduces students to classical western philosophy of law by means of two major critical reactions to traditional and especially Anglo-American legal theory: Jeremy Bentham's castigation of English common (or case) law as a form of primitive law in the 19th century and Brian Tamanaha's criticism of H.L.A. Hart's legal positivism from the vantage of the collision of transplanted US law with traditional law in Micronesia (Yap) in the 21st century. Students will read primary texts in the philosophical traditions that form the main objects of discussion for Bentham, Hart, and Tamanaha: classical common law theory, natural law, Legal Formalism and Legal Realism of the US, and the work of Hart's critics Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin. At the conclusion of the course, students will be familiar with western philosophies of law and major critical responses to them from a global perspective. They will understand the role and importance of judge-made law for Anglo-American philosophies of law and for global critiques of western philosophy of law, and be able to construct arguments based on primary texts in the philosophy of law.

Top